Quote IconPublishers are like, ‘We don’t know who your market is, we don’t know who we’d sell your book to,’ and I’m like, ‘What do you mean? Like… People with reading skills?’
Roxane Gay, talking about writers of color at the “This Woman’s Work” panel at the 2014 Brooklyn Book Festival (via yeahwriters)
nakeyab:

blackgirlstalking:


 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.
Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.


In conversation with Black Girls Talking. Special thank you to Fanta Sylla.
ZoomInfo
nakeyab:

blackgirlstalking:


 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.
Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.


In conversation with Black Girls Talking. Special thank you to Fanta Sylla.
ZoomInfo
nakeyab:

blackgirlstalking:


 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.
Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.


In conversation with Black Girls Talking. Special thank you to Fanta Sylla.
ZoomInfo
nakeyab:

blackgirlstalking:


 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.
Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.


In conversation with Black Girls Talking. Special thank you to Fanta Sylla.
ZoomInfo

nakeyab:

blackgirlstalking:

 It’s not often that I hear a black woman’s art described as “curious.” While creating all of my work, I am overwhelmed with curiosity. I do not think my body of work would exist without it. I remember feeling genuine curiosity as I watched my natural growing in just after chopping it off. At the same time, I also felt angst about what signals it emanated. While creating, I tend to capitalize on the curiosity or the angst to create an image that translates our experiences into something that is visually engaging.

  — Nakeya Brown (nakeyab) describing her state of mind during the creative process.

Read the rest of our interview with the New York-based photographer where we discuss good hair, hair rituals, social media and art.

In conversation with Black Girls Talking. Special thank you to Fanta Sylla.

Quote IconNearly every day, a friend or acquaintance tags me on Facebook, asking me to share a list of 10 books that have influenced me. Nearly every day, I read such lists from the same circle of friends and acquaintances. I understand the tidy pleasures provided by such an exercise, but in truth, I am not merely influenced by books. I could not limit a list of important books to a number or a neatly organized list. The list, whatever it might look like, would always be changing because I too am always changing. I am not influenced by books. Instead, I am shaped by them. I am made of flesh and bone and blood. I am also made of books.
Read the rest of this essay The Books That Made Me Who I Am (via roxanegay)